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What Is Blown-in Loose-Fill Insulation?

Blown insulation what is it

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Blown-in loose-fill insulation works exactly like the name states; loose fiberglass strands are blown into empty spaces using pressurized air. This technique can put insulation anywhere, including cavities in walls or at the base of an unfinished attic.

Blown-in loose-fill insulation is an easy and affordable way to save money on utility bills. If your home is more than 10 years old, there's a good chance you don't have enough insulation. Unfortunately, even newer homes may be lacking proper insulation due to builder shortcuts. No matter your situation, blown-in insulation can fill in the gaps where your home loses heat and cool air, keeping your family comfortable for less.

Blown-in loose-fill insulation works exactly like the name states; loose fiberglass strands are blown into empty spaces using pressurized air This technique can put insulation anywhere, including cavities in walls or at the base of an unfinished attic It's also useful for filling in irregularly shaped areas that other insulation misses, some of which could be letting air pass through.

"The advantage of blown-in material is that it conforms to the space and shape of the area it's in, and it fits like a glove," says Bob Zahm, President of Huntington Heating and Cooling Inc. "It's really cool, efficient stuff."

If you're thinking about installing blown-in insulation yourself, think again. Blown-in insulation should only be put in place by a professional who can properly check for dangers, such as electrical wires, and devise proper workarounds. Still, even with a service call, installing blown-in insulation is relatively quick and painless.

"In many cases, we can completely re-insulate your attic in a few hours, immediately improving your home's comfort, efficiency and even its resale value," says Bob. "Because the product is blown into place, you get complete coverage — even around pipes and outlets, where other types of insulation won't fit. And because the installation process traps millions of tiny air pockets between the pieces, you can usually achieve greater insulation value than traditional batt insulation can provide."

If you see energy bills rising or you feel drafts around the house, chances are good that something isn't as insulated as it could otherwise be. The first place to look for escaping air is the attic, where the thickness of insulation on floors and walls can determine if you have enough material in place.

A professional can do this fairly easily, and will likely check your status before installing any insulation in the home. After that, crevices and hard-to-reach places should also be examined for spots where warm and cool air could be escaping outside. Blow-in insulation improves the energy efficiency of your home by bolstering what you already have and filling in gaps everywhere else.

"The advantage of blown-in material is that it conforms to the space and shape of the area it's in, and it fits like a glove,"... "It's really cool, efficient stuff."

If you're thinking about installing blown-in insulation yourself, think again. Blown-in insulation should only be put in place by a professional who can properly check for dangers, such as electrical wires, and Blown-in loose-fill insulation works exactly like the name states; loose fiberglass strands are blown into empty spaces using pressurized air. This technique can put insulation anywhere, including cavities in walls or at the base of an unfinished attic.

This whole idea of shooting fiberglass strands out of a pressure cannon may sound sloppy, but it's actually a very clean process.

Insulation in your home is only going to be visible where it should be, safe from pets and children who may unknowingly put it in their mouths. Additionally, blown-in fiberglass poses little environmental risk and much of it is made up of recycled materials. For a full list of benefits, ask a professional insulation installer.

"There's very little downside to using this stuff," says Bob. "The machines we have nowadays leave no messes at all. There's no overspray, leftover powdery residue - nothing. And since homeowners could see savings almost immediately, there's no reason not to at least have your home checked to see if additional blown-in insulation could help."